October 15, 2002
Nanotech batteries 100x more powerful

What the article doesn't say is whether this approach can be used to build larger batteries that would have higher power density than existing conventional large batteries. My guess is that the answer is Yes but it is not clear. Anyone know? Prototype devices are expected in 3 years:

All batteries consist of two electrodes, an anode and a cathode, and an electrolyte solution. UF researchers have created both nano-anodes and nano-cathodes, or anodes and cathodes measured on the scale of billionths of a meter. They've shown in tests that these electrodes are as much as 100 times more powerful than traditional ones.

The electrodes also have a unique and promising structure.

"The UF progress is very significant," said Bruce Dunn, a professor of materials science and engineering at the University of California-Los Angeles, the lead institution in the project. "(Martin's) work, the fabrication and testing of nano-dimensional cathodes and anodes, represents the key elements of his concentric tube battery approach, which represents a novel three-dimensional configuration."

Martin and his colleagues create the nano-electrodes using a technique he pioneered called template synthesis. This involves filling millions of tiny "nanoscopic" holes in a centimeter-sized plastic or ceramic template with a solution that contains the chemical components that make up the electrode. After the solution hardens, the researchers remove the template, leaving only the electrodes. The next challenge is to find a way to put together the nano-anode and nano-cathode with a nano-electrolyte and other components.

"We've proposed a totally new design for a battery where all the components are nanomaterials, and we have succeeded in making nearly all of these components," Martin said. "We have not yet developed the technologies to assemble these components, and that's what we're working on."

Robbie Sides, a UF doctoral student in chemistry and one of the researchers in Martin's lab, said UF's nano-anodes and nano-cathodes are not only more powerful than traditional ones, they're also hardier. Lithium-ion battery electrodes might sustain an average of 500 charges and discharges before wearing out, he said. In tests done by another UF chemistry doctoral student on Martin's team, the nano-electrodes sustained as many as 1,400 charges.

Share |      Randall Parker, 2002 October 15 06:45 PM  Nanotech Advances


Comments
Bob said at October 17, 2002 4:33 PM:

On a timely note, I've had two lithium ion batteries for my cellular phone for the past two or three years. They have been failing unexpectedly recently.

After reading your article, I realised they have been recharged about 500 times.... C'est la vie!

Invisible Scientist said at October 18, 2002 6:12 AM:

In this case, although the geometry of the battery seems to increase the surface area of the anodes and cathodes,what it probably does not do is to increase the
total amount of material which actually reacts to create the charge in the battery. Hence my guess is that the
nanotechnology batteries may have a more intense power burst, but the total amount of electricity may be the same, so that it probably won't last more. What probably matters is the special new materials that hold more electricity in the first place. Zine-air batteries already hold 6 times more charge than lead-acid batteries.

Invisible Scientist said at October 18, 2002 6:12 AM:

In this case, although the geometry of the battery seems to increase the surface area of the anodes and cathodes,what it probably does not do is to increase the
total amount of material which actually reacts to create the charge in the battery. Hence my guess is that the
nanotechnology batteries may have a more intense power burst, but the total amount of electricity may be the same, so that it probably won't last more. What probably matters is the special new materials that hold more electricity in the first place. Zine-air batteries already hold 6 times more charge than lead-acid batteries.

Ty said at October 20, 2005 5:21 PM:

Im looking for companies that are involved in this exciting new industry of nano-batteries as this seems to be the next step forward in a huge and growing industry! Any info would be of great help. From Ty

Haku said at October 27, 2005 7:46 PM:

Okay, it's been 3 years now. Any news on this nano-battery?

nanosciam said at January 20, 2006 2:18 PM:

Read article in Scientific American - February 2006 - Article on NANOTECH BATTERIES(page 72)
www.sciam.com

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