September 18, 2007
Gene Affects Sweetness Of Smells Of Others

If you think someone smells sweet it might be down to genes.

To many, urine smells like urine and vanilla smells like vanilla. But androstenone, a derivative of testosterone that is a potent ingredient in male body odor, can smell like either - depending on your genes. While many people perceive a foul odor from androstenone, usually that of stale urine or strong sweat, others find the scent sweet and pleasant. Still others cannot smell it at all.

New research from Rockefeller University, performed in collaboration with scientists at Duke University in North Carolina, reveals for the first time that this extreme variability in people's perception of androstenone is due in large part to genetic variations in a single odorant receptor called OR7D4. The research is reported September 16 as an advance online publication of the journal Nature.

Combine bind genetic tests for OR7D4 with genetic tests for genes that regulate Androstenone secretion and you have the beginnings of a genetic compatibility test. Online match-making services will some day include genetic profile matching. Why go to the trouble of meeting someone you get matched with online if one of you is going to think the other one has a really disgusting smell?

So now we need scientists to discover genetic variations that regulate androstenone production and secretion.

Androstenone, found in higher concentrations in the urine and sweat of men than of women, is used by some mammals to convey social and sexual information, and the ability to perceive androstenone's scent may have far-reaching behavioral implications for humans.

In the largest study ever conducted of its kind, researchers at Rockefeller University presented nearly 400 participants with 66 odors at two different concentrations and asked them to rate the pleasantness and intensity of each odor. When scientists at Duke University identified OR7D4 as a receptor that androstenone selectively activates, Leslie Vosshall, Chemers Family Associate Professor and head of the Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior at Rockefeller University and Andreas Keller, a postdoc in her lab, formed a collaboration with them, and began collecting blood samples from participants and isolated their DNA. The Duke team, led by Hiroaki Matsunami, used DNA from each participant to sequence the gene that encodes the OR7D4 receptor.

You can bet that many more genetic variations that influence physical attraction will be found.

Share |      Randall Parker, 2007 September 18 12:15 AM  Brain Sexuality


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