October 14, 2008
Pectin Binds To Protein Involved In Cancer Progression

Pectin, a carbohydrate found in many fruits and vegetables, might contribute to the anti-cancer effect of fruits and vegetables

Scientists have found a new possible explanation for why people who eat more fruit and vegetables may gain protection against the spread of cancers.

They have shown that a fragment released from pectin, found in all fruits and vegetables, binds to and is believed to inhibit galectin 3 (Gal3), a protein that plays a role in all stages of cancer progression.

"Most claims for the anticancer effects of foods are based on population studies," says Professor Vic Morris from the Institute of Food Research. "For this research we tested a molecular mechanism and showed that it is viable."

Population studies such as EPIC, the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer, identified a strong link between eating lots of fibre and a lower risk of cancers of the gastrointestinal tract. But exactly how fibre exerts a protective effect is unknown.

Pectin is better known for its jam-setting qualities and as being a component of dietary fibre. The present study supports a more exciting and subtle role.

Some readers ask me to write up the complete definitive scientific diet. I keep telling them that they already know what they ought to do but that they do not find the best diet appealing. Very few eat 10 servings of fruits and vegetables per day. Well, that's what you need to do. Just doing that will displace lots of junk out of your diet. But vegetables aren't much fun. Well, there's still fruits.

Share |      Randall Parker, 2008 October 14 12:21 AM  Aging Diet Cancer Studies


Comments
LPP said at October 14, 2008 5:25 PM:

Very few eat 10 servings of fruits and vegetables per day. Well, that's what you need to do. Just doing that will displace lots of junk out of your diet. But vegetables aren't much fun. Well, there's still fruits.

Fruits generally have much higher glycemic indices than vegetables, elevating blood sugar levels unnecessarily. It's better to consume low-glycemic vegetables than initiate an insulin response. While fruits can provide large amounts of vitamins and antioxidants, vegetables still hold a marked nutritional advantage.

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