February 17, 2009
Fruit Juice Increases Type II Diabetes Risk

Eat fruits and vegetables but not sweet drinks if you want to avoid insulin resistant diabetes.

Eating just one more serving of green leafy vegetables or three more servings of fruit a day reduces the risk of developing Type II diabetes, according to results of data analysis performed by researchers in the Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and the Harvard School of Public Health. The research team also found that one serving of fruit juice a day increased the risk of Type II diabetes in women.

Age and obesity both increase the risk of insulin resistant diabetes. That type of diabetes, just like the other type where the immune system attacks insulin-producing cells, accelerates the aging of the whole body. You really want to avoid this. Fortunately you can make dietary choices that'll cut your risk of insulin resistant diabetes. Familiar good foods are good for avoiding diabetes as well.

Tulane epidemiologist Dr. Lydia Bazzano says, “Based on the results of our study, people who have risk factors for diabetes may find it helpful to fill up on leafy greens like lettuces, kale and spinach and whole fruits, like apples, bananas, oranges and watermelon rather than drink fruit juices, which deliver a big sugar load in a liquid form that gets absorbed rapidly.”

Eat vegetables. Eat fruits. Then eat more vegetables and some more fruits.

Bazzano, an assistant professor of epidemiology, cautioned that since this is one of the first studies to separate fruit juice consumption from fruits as a whole, the association between juice and diabetes must be confirmed by additional research.

She and her team analyzed 18 years worth of diet and health data from 71,346 nurses who participated in the Nurses’ Health Study from 1984 to 2002. The women were all between 38 and 63 years old and diabetes-free when the study began. Approximately 7 percent of the participants developed diabetes over the course of the study.

Share |      Randall Parker, 2009 February 17 12:12 AM  Aging Diet Studies


Comments
zylonet said at February 17, 2009 6:43 AM:

I am not sure the advice to eat bananas is good advice. Post-workout bananas might be a good choice, but I have concerns over blood sugar levels. Apples seem to be the best in my experience.

As someone who has an interest in the nutrition industry, the best advice I can give is to take preventative supplements. A combination Acetyl-L-Carnitine and ALA formula will improve energy, cognition and stabilize blood sugar. I recommend 2g ALCAR per day and .6g ALA. Fenugreek supplements are also advised for those encountering insulin resistance. Green tea (600mg EGCG) is a great choice for overall health as are pycnogenol and milk thistle. Of course, 10g per day molecularly distilled fish oil is a must for reducing inflammation and optimizing brain performance. For any supplement, I advise buying in bulk and capping yourself as this saves a great deal of money. Fish oil can be purchased in bulk (2 year supplies in oil or softgel) for very little; just be sure to purchase only molecularly distilled fish oil.

While supplements are great, two big salads and one hour exercise per day are a prerequisite for overall health. The key is to keep the body alkaline and to reduce inflammation.

Unfortunately the AMA has brainwashed Dr.s into believing that nutritional supplements are bad or ineffective, which is utter hogwash. Moreover, Dr.s are a lazy lot who have a license to wealth without continuous hard work so there is no incentive for them to research the proper use of supplements. When used appropriately, the evidence in support of supplements is overwhelming. The effects are certainly far below those of drugs, but the idea is prevention and minor enhancement. Moreover, no OTC drug can currently deliver the increase in energy, libido,and mental acuity that can be found with proper dietary supplementation.

For anyone wondering about multivitamins, I am not a fan and do not take them. I think vitamins and minerals need to come from the diet. Supplements are best used to counter modern chemicals, poor diets (refined grains) and genetic deficiencies like fatigue (which I believe is common in Northern European peoples).

bbartlog said at February 17, 2009 8:39 AM:

So is there some conclusion as to why eating fruit is good, while fruit juice is bad? Three obvious hypotheses:

1) Whole fruit takes longer to digest than fruit juice, so the sugar spike is less and we are better able to handle it.

If this is the issue, you could mitigate the risk by drinking fruit juice only after other food.

2) There is other stuff in whole fruit that is good for us (more than the juice is bad for us), at least as measured by diabetes risk.

In this case it would make more sense to take most of the juice out of the fruit, then eat the now non-juicy remnants. Which frankly sounds masochistic but YMMV.

3) Something else in the fruit is used as an early warning signal by our digestive system that it needs to start handling a big load of fructose. When the juice is extracted the signal compound/factor is lost and we have to fall back to our other (inferior) system, that relies on actual high levels of blood sugar as a trigger for insulin.

If this is the case then we'd really like to analyze the signal and control process further, since we can probably find some good uses for whatever compunds are at work.

David Govett said at February 17, 2009 9:46 AM:

Green-tipped bananas have less sugar.

Nick G said at February 17, 2009 10:09 AM:

Zylonet, I'm not familiar with "molecularly distilled fish oil " I googled it, and found this: "Stay away from fish oil that has been molecularly distilled. The distillation process alters the natural form of the oil. Yes, it may remove some of the toxins, but the oil is no longer in it's natural state. As a matter of fact, molecular distillation causes the oil to be oxidized and there's nothing worse for you than an oxidized oil. If your fish oil is molecularly distilled, you should be wondering how polluted the fish oil was to start with that they had to use such an aggressive purification process on it. "

Here's the source: http://www.squidoo.com/fish_oil

What do you think??

zylonet said at February 17, 2009 12:29 PM:

Nick,

I don't buy the notion that a person should forgo molecularly distilled fish oil in favor of something all natural. Every respectable brand molecularly distills their product to ensure that it's free of heavy metals and pcbs. One problem I have with the nutrition business is the number of crackpots who suggest things that make little sense or they advocate a weird position that may have merit, but entails taking a greater risk elsewhere. I wouldn't worry about oxidation from molecular distillation. I think this is a red herring. Oxidation is more likely to occur from an open bottle.

Nick G said at February 17, 2009 1:11 PM:

zylonet,

Any idea how much fish oil is heated in molecular distillation? How good is the vacuum? Is the remaining gas, if any, inert?

What do you think of flax seed oil? I've had good luck with it, for both myself and our dogs, who've had very sensitive skin cured by it.

"A combination Acetyl-L-Carnitine and ALA formula "

That sounds like Juvenon. Did you make a point of avoiding the brand name for a reason? Is there something else you prefer?

Bob Badour said at February 17, 2009 6:34 PM:

Nick,

I was buying Acetyl-L-Carnitine and ALA separately and taking both daily well over a decade ago. Why would a particular brand name have any significance?

Jake said at February 17, 2009 7:33 PM:

All fruits are quickly converted to glucose whether they are whole or in fruit juice. Fruits should be limited to berries as they are relatively low in sugar. Never eat a fruit in isolation. Eat them with some protein or fats just as the French do to minimize that damage done by insulin spikes.

Fruits are one reason diabetes is rampant among vegetarians.

Wolf-Dog said at February 18, 2009 4:03 AM:

In comparison to fruit juice, how dangerous is it to add sugar to tea? Brown sugar?

bbartlog said at February 18, 2009 4:06 AM:

Fruits are one reason diabetes is rampant among vegetarians.

Instead of just parroting what you think you know, please provide some explanation of why this study contradicts your viewpoint. They found fruit consumption lowered diabetes risk. Did they fail to account for confounding variables? Is it just that fruit displaces other items, like white flour, that might be even worse? If someone posts an academic result, you really need to provide some explanation beyond just 'oh no, things are the opposite of what they say here'.

zylonet said at February 18, 2009 4:15 AM:

zylonet,

"Any idea how much fish oil is heated in molecular distillation? How good is the vacuum? Is the remaining gas, if any, inert?"

No I sure don't know how much gas is remaining, if any. I would suggest calling the people at a major brand and asking them. I just don't deal in this area in a production or formulation sense so my knowledge is not extensive.

"What do you think of flax seed oil? I've had good luck with it, for both myself and our dogs, who've had very sensitive skin cured by it."

Flax is great. If it's working, then no reason to change.

--"A combination Acetyl-L-Carnitine and ALA formula" That sounds like Juvenon. Did you make a point of avoiding the brand name for a reason? Is there something else you prefer?"--

Forget products like Juveon; they are way overpriced and normally underdosed. Buy the ingredients in bulk, then cap them yourself. Buy the encapsulator and capsules at capsuline and buy the bulk products at bulk nutrition or purebulk.com or any similar site. It's really easy to make your own products. I recommend a larger encapsulator as it will save a great deal of time. Once you own the encapsulator you can then copy formulas from existing brands (Life Extension) that list the blend in detail. You can save a ton of money and you can better control what works for you. Depending on what you purchase, you may want to keep some ingredients in glass jars (either 1 quart mason jars or buy a big glass jar online). Some bulk products will come in plastic tubs, but humidity will penetrate the barrier. This is an issue with ingredients like ALCAR, but is not a problem with other ingredients like AAKG. If you are mixing your own ingredients at home, you can use either a KitchenAid mixer or just put the ingredients in a quart mason jar and shake for several minutes. The dispersion will be good enough. Once you get going you can start to work with great ingredients like PEA/Hordenine, Pikamilon, Phenibut, etc. Good stuff.

Good luck.


David Prince said at February 18, 2009 12:58 PM:

Eat meat. Pork, beef, chicken, fish, turkey, shrimp. If it walks, flys, crawls, or swims, eat it. And eat eggs too. And eat anything green to accompany your meat. Watch your glucose fall through the floor. Don't trust me.

Try it. Get your self a glucose meter and take before and after readings. You don't have to trust me or some scientist. Or blog.

Eat meat and watch your glucose fall through the floor.

Bob Badour said at February 18, 2009 5:15 PM:

And watch your potassium requirements go through the roof, while you piss away up to a pound of fat per day.

I suggest doctor supervision so that you can get enough potassium to keep your heart from stopping.

David Prince said at February 18, 2009 10:47 PM:

So you agree, eating meat lowers glucose levels.

Bob Badour said at February 19, 2009 11:49 AM:

Yes: Eating meat without carbohydrates lowers glucose levels.

It's even possible to enter a ketogenic state that melts fat away at amazing rates. However, doing so increases one's potassium requirements to the point where one must supplement with doses of potassium that would stop your heart if you were not limiting carbs and where failure to supplement will cause massive muscle spasms at best and a stopped heart at worst.

Shreela said at February 20, 2009 1:09 AM:

Not that I'm a research scientist, but that article's study seemed poor to me because they didn't study the differences between just-juice and just-fruit. The just-fruit group also ate more greens, which might have helped prevent diabetes in its own way.

Also, the article didn't state whether the juice was commercial juice with X% sugar or HFCS vs freshly squeezed juice with no additional sugars.

I've read that fiber slows down how quickly blood sugar rises after meals. If that's true, I bet fruit having fiber, when juice doesn't, is one of the big reasons why juice is worse for diabetics (in addition to commercial juices being high in refined sugar and HFCS).

Allan said at February 23, 2009 3:54 PM:

My experience with flax seed oil, which I was taking after eye surgery at the advice of my eye doctor, is that it thins your blood to the point of a little prostrate bleeding. It took a while for that to happen but the blood in my semen would stop if I stopped taking the flax seed oil.

On the other hand, eating spinach daily (vitamin k) seemed to stop the bleeding. So I would say that if you want to take flax seed oil, eat spinach.

Nick G said at February 23, 2009 4:12 PM:

"it thins your blood to the point of a little prostrate bleeding."

Good god, no amount of flax seed oil should be able to do that. Have you told your doctor??

David Prince said at March 5, 2009 1:35 PM:

>>It's even possible to enter a ketogenic state that melts fat away at amazing rates. However, doing so increases >>one's potassium requirements to the point where one must supplement with doses of potassium that would stop your heart
>>if you were not limiting carbs and where failure to supplement will cause massive muscle spasms at best and a stopped
>>heart at worst.

I've not found this to be true. I do supplement with potassium, but no more than the recommended daily allowance. I can keep supplementing after I stop replacing carbs with meats and greens, and I don't die. Should I be dead?

Any studies you have to cite? I always enjoy reading the relevant literature.

Kristal L. Rosebrook said at April 7, 2009 11:18 PM:

I agree with Nick. How much were you taking. WOW!

Kristal L. Rosebrook

Fred natak said at July 12, 2011 5:44 AM:

A recent study has concluded that fruit juice has an effective glycemic index of around 80. (compared to the currently stated 45)

It also concludes that comparison of carbohydrate liquids and solids by a single consideration of area under a blood glucose curve per the current Glycemic index is invalid.

For liquids all carbohydrates are immediately available for conversion to glucose so the area under the blood glucose curve or GI is always going to be less than for solids that release carbohydrates more slowly. The relationship between the initial rate of blood glucose increase (which is the most important glycemic marker) and the area under the curve is therefore different for solids and liquids.

It is therefore not surprising that fruit juice along with all carbohydrate liquids is implicated in health problems.

A full discussion can be found at the following sites

http://sites.google.com/site/bangkatanfiles

http://bangkatanblog.blogspot.com

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