April 05, 2009
China Makes Big Push For Electric Cars

The momentum behind electric cars keeps building. The top leadership of China has decided to turn China into a big maker of electric cars.

TIANJIN, China — Chinese leaders have adopted a plan aimed at turning the country into one of the leading producers of hybrid and all-electric vehicles within three years, and making it the world leader in electric cars and buses after that.

Since this command is coming from the top and the Chinese can move mountains with that level of commitment you can be sure that this initiative will take off.

Beyond manufacturing, subsidies of up to $8,800 are being offered to taxi fleets and local government agencies in 13 Chinese cities for each hybrid or all-electric vehicle they purchase. The state electricity grid has been ordered to set up electric car charging stations in Beijing, Shanghai and Tianjin.

Government research subsidies for electric car designs are increasing rapidly. And an interagency panel is planning tax credits for consumers who buy alternative energy vehicles.

The US could soon find itself in permanent 3rd place for electric car manufacture.

State-owned Chinese car maker SAIC will use US technology to speed their entry into the hybrid car market.

BEIJING -- SAIC Motor Corp., one of China's biggest state-owned auto makers, is turning to American technology suppliers to engineer a gasoline-electric hybrid car that could go on sale in China as soon as next year.

SAIC is planning to use technology from A123 Systems, a closely held battery maker based in Watertown, Mass., and auto-parts maker Delphi Corp., based in Troy, Mich., according to a Delphi statement and people familiar with the matter.

Chinese mobile phone maker BYD has designed the batteries for its own electric car.

When BYD Auto launches one of China's first mass produced fully electric sedans later this year, it will be trying to conquer the world rather than save it. But such is the explosive growth of China's car market and thirst for petrol that the two goals are likely to become ever more synonymous.

The E6 plug-in is currently under wraps at the company's sprawling industrial complex in Shenzhen, but it will soon be at the vanguard of a company's – and a nation's – plans to dominate the global market for "clean-transport".

Electric cars look expensive with today's gasoline prices. But when an economic recovery kicks in and demand recovers the economics of electric vehicles will become a lot more favorable.

Meanwhile in the North American market Ford will role out pluggable hybrid and pure electric cars in 2010, 2011 and 2012.

Ford is also working with auto supplier Magna International to release an all-electric compact sedan in 2011, which will get about 70 percent better mileage than non-hybrid models. This car will be a Focus-size vehicle that will go 100 miles on a charge, said Greg Frenette, the assistant chief engineer of battery electric-vehicle applications at Ford.

Ford also has a pluggable hybrid coming in 2012.

Ford's first pure electric vehicle looks like a crossover van for moving people. Previous articles reported this vehicle as aimed at the taxi market.

During an exclusive interview with FOXNews.com, Lisa Drake, Chief Engineer for Ford Global Hybrid and Battery Electric Vehicles told the FOX Car Report LIVE! program that her company’s upcoming electric vehicle will be priced between $50,000 and $70,000 when it goes on sale in 2010.

What I wonder: How fast for a recharge? If you've got the amps and 220V can it get recharged in, say, a half hour? If so, a shop that sends out, say, plumbing repair workers or other local driving workers could recharge the vehicle and lunch and go thru 2 recharge cycles a day. That sort of usage pattern would maximize the return on investment.

Share |      Randall Parker, 2009 April 05 06:42 PM  Energy Electric Cars


Comments
Fat Man said at April 5, 2009 7:34 PM:

Reminds me of articles about Japan's fifth generation computing project in the 1980s. Out side of producing hysteria, neither the articles nor Japan ever accomplished anything.

Sherry said at April 5, 2009 9:05 PM:

There could be no better investment in America than to invest in America becoming energy independent! We need to utilize everything in out power to reduce our dependence on foreign oil including using our own natural resources. Create cheap clean energy, new badly needed green jobs and reduce our dependence on foreign oil.The high cost of fuel this past year seriously damaged our economy and society. The cost of fuel effects every facet of consumer goods from production to shipping costs. It costs the equivalent of 60 cents per gallon to charge and drive an electric car. If all gasoline cars, trucks, and SUV's instead had plug-in electric drive trains the amount of electricity needed to replace gasoline is about equal to the estimated wind energy potential of the state of North Dakota.We have so much available to us such as wind and solar. Let's spend some of those bail out billions and get busy harnessing this energy. Create cheap clean energy, badly needed new jobs and reduce our dependence on foreign oil. What a win-win situation that would be for our nation at large! There is a really good new book out by Jeff Wilson called The Manhattan Project of 2009 Energy Independence Now. http://www.themanhattanprojectof2009.com

th said at April 6, 2009 4:55 PM:

"If all gasoline cars, trucks, and SUV's instead had plug-in electric drive trains the amount of electricity needed to replace gasoline is about equal to the estimated wind energy potential of the state of North Dakota.We have so much available to us such as wind and solar."

Total US daily consumption of gasoline is 390 million gallons, on a BTU basis, that works out to half the daily total theoretical wind generation of the top twenty states combined, so theoretically, these 20 states COMBINED, not North Dakota, will supply twice the gasoline equivalent in BTU's as needed on a daily basis, this doesn't include the daily US diesel requirements or a whole host of other stuff, so I bet its wash.

This site only reveals the totals for wind power, but its a start...
http://www.awea.org/faq/wwt_potential.html
...the rest I doubt you will look into, but nonetheless, get a better book.

Engineer-Poet said at April 6, 2009 9:20 PM:
a shop that sends out, say, plumbing repair workers or other local driving workers could recharge the vehicle and lunch and go thru 2 recharge cycles a day.
Ever think what the demand curve would look like if a large fraction of the vehicles on the road replaced the morning's motive energy between noon and 1 PM?  If there are peaking problems now....

It would make much more sense for vehicles to be "opportunistic chargers".  Plug in at every stop (paying the utility directly), grab a little or a lot depending on the immediate demand situation, burn fuel if the charge is insufficient.  Bonus if you can flag the employees to drive with a lighter foot when grid power is more expensive, and vice versa.

th sez:

Total US daily consumption of gasoline is 390 million gallons, on a BTU basis, that works out to half the daily total theoretical wind generation of the top twenty states combined
You forgot to discount that gasoline by the typical overall vehicle efficiency of roughly 15%.  Once you've tossed all the ICE conversion losses and the majority of the braking losses that you would recover with a PHEV or EV, North Dakota's production would cover the rest.

th said at April 8, 2009 4:53 PM:

Poet sez:

"North Dakota's production would cover the rest."

The only problem is North Dakota wind generation right now is in reality, only about 10% of the state's total electricity demand, and since it looks like it won't get any better and since the horribly inefficient grid and all of the other inefficiencies of fossil fuels in general should be very easy to beat but aren't yet, theoretical still only counts to green nuts and in horseshoes.

Engineer-Poet said at April 8, 2009 9:31 PM:

Why won't N. Dakota's generation get any better?  Inadequate connectivity to larger energy markets?  That can change, and probably will.

th said at April 10, 2009 3:15 PM:

I read that in 2004 to 2006, new wind power installations of that timeframe had a 26% rate of 40% of rated capacity, from 06 to 08 that rate dropped to 17%, this was not limited to any area such as ND, just in general of all added windpower in 06 to 08. The best sites are probably falling short of expectations. ND has doubled its wind generation capacity since 06 from 300 something MW to 700 something, with only a 2% in actual gains with respect to instate demand. Some of that is here:
http://www1.eere.energy.gov/windandhydro/pdfs/43025.pdf

th said at April 10, 2009 3:29 PM:

Actually, I was wrong on all counts, ND only gets 1% from wind not 10% and the gain was only .2%, thats why I should never do anything from memory.

Post a comment
Comments:
Name (not anon or anonymous):
Email Address:
URL:
Remember info?

                       
Go Read More Posts On FuturePundit
Site Traffic Info
The contents of this site are copyright ©