November 02, 2009
Metabolic Syndrome Is A Killer

High cholesterol isn't as dangerous as a combination of obesity, high blood pressure, and high blood sugar (insulin resistant diabetes).

The team, led by Assistant Clinical Professor of Public Health at Warwick Medical School Dr Oscar Franco, has discovered that simultaneously having obesity, high blood pressure and high blood sugar are the most dangerous combination of health factors when developing metabolic syndrome.

How dangerous are these factors? Way more.

In his study, published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, Dr Franco has identified the most dangerous combination of these conditions to be central obesity, high blood pressure and high blood sugar. People who have all three of these conditions are twice as likely to have a heart attack and three times more likely to die earlier than the general population.

His team looked at 3,078 people to track the prevalence and progress of Metabolic Syndrome as part of the Framingham Offspring Study.

What to do about it? Exercise and a better diet of course.

Intensive lifestyle changes aimed at modest weight loss reduced the rate of developing type 2 diabetes by 34 percent over 10 years in people at high risk for the disease.

My own advice: eat lots and lots of vegetables, drug no sweet drinks, and avoid food that has high fructose corn syrup or sugar in it. Start reading labels.

I suspect the benefit of frequent interaction with health-care professionals mainly came in the form of repetitive encouragement to lose weight and eat better and less food.

The DPP results showed that intensive lifestyle changes, including exercise, reducing calories and fat intake and frequent interaction with health-care professionals, reduced the development of type 2 diabetes by 58 percent after three years. Those assigned to two daily doses of metformin but no lifestyle changes reduced the development of the disease by 31 percent over the same period.

Of course you could just take the drug. It'll only deliver about half the benefit but with much less effort.

Share |      Randall Parker, 2009 November 02 10:40 PM  Aging Diet Metabolism


Comments
dlp said at November 3, 2009 5:22 AM:

I'm reminded of the chart in Taubes' book that shows a correlation between low cholesterol and high mortality rates.

And I don't understand "reducing...fat intake." If you stop eating sugars, high-fructose corn syrup and other concentrated carbohydrate foods, you have to replace the calories with something, and the something must necessarily be fat/protein.

PacRim Jim said at November 4, 2009 1:58 PM:

Eat starches, not simple sugars, to control your blood sugar. Vegetables contain both fats and proteins. Though we might not have exactly the same enzymes as horses and cows, they certainly seem to do fine with vegetables.

dlp said at November 5, 2009 11:37 AM:

Eat starches, not simple sugars, to control your blood sugar.

Starches are sugar and like all concentrated carbohydrate foods have an elevating effect on serum glucose.

Though we might not have exactly the same enzymes as horses and cows, they certainly seem to do fine with vegetables.

Humans are omnivores. And farmers fatten up livestock with starchy, high-carbohydrate corn feed.

Post a comment
Comments:
Name (not anon or anonymous):
Email Address:
URL:
Remember info?

                       
Go Read More Posts On FuturePundit
Site Traffic Info
The contents of this site are copyright