February 28, 2010
Alien Star Clusters In Milky Way Galaxy

Think about the implications: Intelligent alien species could have migrated into our galaxy from an older galaxy riding along with a star cluster.

KINGSTON, ON As many as one quarter of the star clusters in our Milky Way many more than previously thought are invaders from other galaxies, according to a new study. The report also suggests there may be as many as six dwarf galaxies yet to be discovered within the Milky Way rather than the two that were previously confirmed.

"Some of the stars and star clusters you see when you look into space at night are aliens from another galaxy, just not the green-skinned type you find in a Hollywood movie. These 'alien' star clusters that have made their way into our galaxy over the last few billion years," says Terry Bridges, an astronomer at Queen's University in Kingston, Canada.

Six dwarf galaxies in the Milky Way: Are the aliens in them short in stature?

Galaxies have collisions with other galaxies and either combine into a single galaxy or exchange some mass. Did these alien star clusters from from accidental collisions? Or did some aliens contrive to eject their star clusters from their own galaxies aimed at the Milky Way billions of years ago? Maybe they were losing factions in battles in their own galaxies and escaped from otherwise certain destruction by riding away in star clusters.

Anyone understand the politics of alien star cluster escapes?

Share |      Randall Parker, 2010 February 28 04:35 PM  Space Alien Intelligence


Comments
random said at March 1, 2010 8:21 AM:

You can call it Invasion or Manifest Destiny, but as always "History is written by the victors." I for one, will welcome our new alien planet overlords.

LarryD said at March 1, 2010 9:44 AM:

Only six? From what I've been reading over the last year or so, large galaxies are all believed to form by collision of smaller galaxies, so what is surprising is that there are still identifiable remains of the previous galaxies left inside of the Milky Way.

Alvin said at March 1, 2010 1:41 PM:

Who says that our planet isn't also one of the invaders... Maybe we lack documentation and are due to be booted...

jso said at March 1, 2010 1:42 PM:

the proper term is "extra-galactic"

kjackman said at March 1, 2010 2:13 PM:

The study specifically examined globular clusters. These do not lie "within" the galaxy the same way that the sun is "within" it; i.e., they are not in the spiral arms. They tend to hang out in a halo or sphere around the galactic center. Also, their stars (Population II) are of a type that are unlikely to harbor life. As far as I know, no one has attempted such a study on Population I stars within the galactic arms, like our sun.

Jay Manifold said at March 1, 2010 2:17 PM:

These are globular clusters, which are metal-poor ("metal," in astrophysics, being anything above helium on the periodic table) and therefore very unlikely to contain life.

The Milky Way is quite dynamic, however, and undoubtedly contains metal-rich stellar systems that originated in other galaxies. See Wading in the Tidal Streams of the Milky Way, for example.

Jace said at March 1, 2010 3:22 PM:

They were probably fleeing galactic healthcare being imposed up them from above.

logic 101 said at March 1, 2010 6:20 PM:

According to The Universe on the history channel, these globular clusters contain much younger stars than our sun, which could explain the lack of heavy metals and the high unlikelyhood of planets & life.

Blogog said at March 1, 2010 6:29 PM:

"Alien Star Clusters." Sounds like a good name for a candy.

Lorenzo said at March 1, 2010 9:22 PM:

Forget candy - that's a great name for a rock group!

Gerry said at March 1, 2010 9:29 PM:

Given the forces invovlved in the capture of 'star glusters' by our galazy, I'd doubt that any advanced life form would survive. We have photos of colliding galaxys and the ensuing cosmic force distortions, so what would the forces or random collision of a star cluster with a spiral galaxy like ours. Probably tear the skin off of a bacteria, and shred a virus..

Gerry said at March 1, 2010 9:33 PM:

Given the forces invovlved in the capture of 'star glusters' by our galazy, I'd doubt that any advanced life form would survive. We have photos of colliding galaxys and the ensuing cosmic force distortions, so what would the forces or random collision of a star cluster with a spiral galaxy like ours. Probably tear the skin off of a bacteria, and shred a virus..

Toadal said at March 1, 2010 10:09 PM:

Gerry said "... so what would the forces or random collision of a star cluster with a spiral galaxy like ours. Probably tear the skin off of a bacteria, and shred a virus.."

Yeah, probably that or much less .... There is simply so much space between stars that only those native stars in close proximity to the nucleus of the colliding alien cluster would be disturbed by the resulting tidal forces.

The probable result?

The cluster would capture native stars and enlarge itself, like a snowball rolling down a slope.

It's unlikely the planets surrounding the native stars would be disturbed, however, their lifeforms would enjoy the magnificent show.

M.W.Music said at March 1, 2010 10:34 PM:

Warning! A gigantic thing is barreling toward us at a speed of 186 miles per second! At that rate, the Andromeda galaxy will collide with ours in 3 billion years, so get your affairs in order, and make peace with your deity or deities.

Mahone Dunbar said at March 1, 2010 11:10 PM:

I'm hopeing they taste good, and that we can exploit the body parts we can't digest by using them as a fuel supply.

Brian H said at March 2, 2010 1:00 AM:

Gerry;
unlikely it would tear the skin off a bacteria, since a bacteria has to be at least two to be one. Being the plural of bacterium and all, y'know? ;)

Scott said at March 3, 2010 6:35 PM:

"The report also suggests there may be as many as six dwarf galaxies yet to be discovered within the Milky Way rather than the two that were previously confirmed."

How is it possible that there were two "previously confirmed" "yet to be discovered" dwarf galaxies?

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