January 11, 2012
Hormone Irisin Causes Fat Burn-Off

Researchers at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston find a hormone that makes a high-fat diet less damaging. The hormone has effects similar to that of exercise - but without all that effort and time spent exercising.

Mice given irisin lost a few grams in the first 10 days after treatment, the study shows, and certain genes involved in powering the cell were turned on. Irisin also appeared to reduce the damage done by a high-fat diet, protecting mice against diet-induced obesity and diabetes, according to the paper, whose first author is postdoctoral fellow Pontus Boström.

Drug delivery is a serious problem in this case. Also, it isn't clear this hormone will deliver all the benefits of exercise.

Share |      Randall Parker, 2012 January 11 10:52 PM  Aging Diet Metabolism


Comments
Randall Parker said at January 15, 2012 12:54 PM:

Hey, I've never before deleted an entire post's comments. There's a first time for everything. I welcome discussion of what the post is about.

Engineer-Poet said at January 15, 2012 5:10 PM:

People keep hoping for a "magic bullet" against fat.  I'd love to have one personally, but I get the feeling that if it was that simple we wouldn't have the problem in the first place.  The great thing is that better understanding of the system means not only that we can find multiple levers to lean on, but we can also see how the problem occurs at the outset.  If we can stop it from getting worse or increase the effects of the limited exercise people have the time (or energy or joint endurance) to fit in, the overall improvement could be considerable.

tom said at January 16, 2012 9:42 AM:

I must have been too indoctrinated by the low-carb people. But when I read "Irisin also appeared to reduce the damage done by a high-fat diet, protecting mice against diet-induced obesity and diabetes, according to the paper, whose first author is postdoctoral fellow Pontus Boström," I wondered if anyone has ever in history gotten diabetes from a high-fat diet. High sugars, maybe. But it's strange that they would blame dietary fat this way.

Karl said at January 18, 2012 12:11 PM:

tom -

hydrogenated fats have been thought to promote diabetes - not sure how robust the science is.

It should be noted that mice are herbivores - not like humans..

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