November 12, 2013
Amazon Deforestation Seen Causing Western USA Drought

Another reason to save the Amazon.

In research meant to highlight how the destruction of the Amazon rainforest could affect climate elsewhere, Princeton University-led researchers report that the total deforestation of the Amazon may significantly reduce rain and snowfall in the western United States, resulting in water and food shortages, and a greater risk of forest fires.

Dry winters.

The researchers report in the Journal of Climate that an Amazon stripped bare could mean 20 percent less rain for the coastal Northwest and a 50 percent reduction in the Sierra Nevada snowpack, a crucial source of water for cities and farms in California. Previous research has shown that deforestation will likely produce dry air over the Amazon. Using high-resolution climate simulations, the researchers are the first to find that the atmosphere's normal weather-moving mechanics would create a ripple effect that would move that dry air directly over the western United States from December to February.

In case you do not know: the winter months are when it rains in California.

The impact of homo sapiens on the planet is becoming so big that it is causing environmental problems beyond just species extinction.

Share |      Randall Parker, 2013 November 12 09:52 PM 


Comments
Wolf-Dog said at November 14, 2013 8:49 PM:

It might be possible to compensate by launching a major reforestation campaign of forests in the United States as well as other parts of the world. Surely there are forests in many countries.

Remarkable new hybrid trees grow 8 feet per year:

http://www.fast-growing-trees.com/FastestTrees.htm

And these were so far only hybrids, when real genetic engineering becomes successful in a few years, some monster plants will probably grow 50 feet per year.

Wolf-Dog said at November 14, 2013 8:50 PM:

It might be possible to compensate by launching a major reforestation campaign of deserts in the United States as well as other parts of the world. Surely there are forests in many countries.

Remarkable new hybrid trees grow 8 feet per year:

http://www.fast-growing-trees.com/FastestTrees.htm

And these were so far only hybrids, when real genetic engineering becomes successful in a few years, some monster plants will probably grow 50 feet per year.

Tom Billings said at November 14, 2013 10:52 PM:

More to the point would be action in the Amazon Basin itself. In particular, the point that the forest being gone *need*not* mean a barren land there. Terra Preta Dos Indios is capable of holding nutrients quite well. It, along with 80+ food bearing tree species, was the basis of the pre-Columbian settled agrarian cultures of the Amazon Basin. I am always amazed that people assume that the only alternative to the status quo is disastrous.

If nothing else, the tree cutters could be required to dig up the roots and other non-timber majority mass of the trees they cut, and use Terra Preta low-temp charcoaling tech on them to create the soil-transforming charcoal/fungus combo they would then mix with the soil to hold nutrients in spite of the rains. This was done as early as 500BC by the indigenous peoples of the Amazon Basin, IIRC, and should be no technical problem today. This can be applied in all tropical/equatorial high rainfall areas threatened by deforestation, and saves half the carbon as charcoal, that then holds nutrients. From there we can get new biomes. Forests are nice, and I like those near Portland, but they are not the only thing needed.

Post a comment
Comments:
Name (not anon or anonymous):
Email Address:
URL:
Remember info?

                       
Go Read More Posts On FuturePundit
Site Traffic Info
The contents of this site are copyright