November 01, 2015
Death Rate Decline In USA Flattens

In the last few years the long term decline in death rates has flattened out. The speculation is that this is a delayed effect of the rise in obesity.

What's interesting: the death rates from stroke and heart disease have declined faster than the death rate from cancer. Well, cancer is a much harder problem to solve. So as cancer becomes a larger fraction of total deaths it becomes harder to increase life expectancy.

Obesity is probably an easier problem to solve than cancer. Eventually drugs that suppress appetite will be found. When will we have cures for most of the currently fatal cancers?

Share |      Randall Parker, 2015 November 01 12:07 PM 


Comments
Bob B said at November 2, 2015 11:53 AM:

he ACA was signed into law to reform the health care industry by President Barack Obama on March 23, 2010

Tom Maguire said at November 2, 2015 12:47 PM:

Death rates flattening? This just in, from the Monday NY Times:

Death Rates Rising for Middle-Aged White Americans, Study Finds

Something startling is happening to middle-aged white Americans. Unlike every other age group, unlike every other racial and ethnic group, unlike their counterparts in other rich countries, death rates in this group have been rising, not falling.

That finding was reported Monday by two Princeton economists, Angus Deaton, who last month won the 2015 Nobel Prize for Economic Sciences, and Anne Case. Analyzing health and mortality data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and from other sources, they concluded that rising annual death rates among this group are being driven not by the big killers like heart disease and diabetes but by an epidemic of suicides and afflictions stemming from substance abuse: alcoholic liver disease and overdoses of heroin and prescription opioids.

They are looking at 1999-2013, so we can blame both Bush and Obama.

The study is at:

www.pnas.org/content/early/2015/10/29/1518393112.full.pdf

Kevin said at November 2, 2015 12:57 PM:

So, in other words, we're reaching the limits of antibiotics, vaccinations and healthy living?

Anonymous said at November 2, 2015 1:09 PM:

Looking at my peers, late middle aged whites, we are Lukewarm about healthy living.

Bob Greiner said at November 2, 2015 4:12 PM:

About cancer death rates:

Death of cancer is an interesting look at cancer mechanics, and a new, more universal, way to fight cancer.

Unfortunately, the way is alien to the FDA.

The author is Vincent DeVita, who has establishment creds as a cancer war fighter.

I have now seen that war from every possible angle: as a researcher, clinician and the longest-serving director at the NCI; as physician-in-chief at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC); as director of Yale University’s Cancer Center; as president of the American Cancer Society (ACS); and, most recently, as a patient myself.

Worth reading, I think.

Crocodile Chuck said at November 2, 2015 10:40 PM:

When will we have cures for most of the currently fatal cancers?

A: Never.

We all have to die of something.

BU2B said at November 4, 2015 8:59 AM:

The NY Times didn't mention that the increase in death rates among American white males was tiny from 2000. The percentage increase is so small, in fact, that it can't be detected from the statistical noise.

Larry said at November 5, 2015 1:50 PM:

Cancer is cracking. Immunotherapy is producing amazing results. That plus the collapse of DNA profiling costs are about to allow us to understand cancer genetics and individual variability in far greater detail. Individualized treatments will follow...

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